Shana Tova!

Written by AJA 12th grader Nicole Dori and 11th grader Shani Kadosh

 

Before we end off our year, we want to leave you with a few words of inspiration to guide you through these next few days. So as you are all well aware of, hopefully, tonight is a very special night. It’s not just any night, it’s a very special holiday. And it’s not just any holiday, but rather the holiday that begins all holidays--Rosh Hashana. But what exactly is so special about this holiday. We understand it’s the start of the new year, but so what? Why do we care?


We’d like to bring up a few ideas we learned throughout these past days. As we began yesterday and finished this morning, the upper school girls talked about the meaning of the actual words “Rosh Hashana.” We have two separate words: “Rosh” meaning “head” or “beginning” and “shana” coming from the shoresh of “sheeneh” or “meshaneh” meaning change. So this holiday marks the beginning of change, of our transformation into or back into the people we want to be.

 

This concept of change and transformation is widely known as the concept of Teshuva. A specific symbol throughout the holiday which is used as representation of this is through the blowing of the shofar. Now, the shofar wasn’t randomly chosen as the image of Teshuva; it has great significance that some of us might ignore or simply don’t know about.

 

At the most basic level, we have the actual sound of it. Normally when the shofar is blown, you might jump or are caught by surprise because of how loud and sudden it is. That is the exact goal of the shofar. It’s noise is like an alarm clock for us, to wake us up and draw attention to the fact that it is time for Teshuva, it is time to return back to Hashem. The noise of the shofar is there to wake us up and notify us of the special time ahead of us.

 

Then we get into the physical shofar, how it looks, where it came from… We know that the shofar is a ram’s horn, but why do we choose the horn and why of a ram? An interesting idea we learned was that the ram’s horn is the only internal bone that actually penetrates the skin, meaning it is the only bone of the ram that begins inside and ends outside.

 

How can we relate this to ourselves? Over the course of Rosh Hashana, we are repenting for our past, devoting ourselves to a better future, but most importantly, we are choosing what kind of people we want to be moving forward. In this phase, we are trying to embody the moments when we wholeheartedly followed in the ways of Hashem, living lives full of morality and integrity.

 

In reference back to the horn, just like the shofar is the only bone that is taken from the inside to the outside, so too should we take what’s inside of us, our neshamot, and bring it out. We try to emulate our neshamot, take that purity inside of us and express it on the outside in our day-to-day lives.

 

We’d like to bring this all together with one final idea. When blowing the shofar, a small puff of air goes in and out comes a huge sound that can be heard from many meters away. All it takes is for a small breath to create such a large sound.

 

Just like this small breath can cause great things, so can our Teshuva, no matter how small. So even if you’re going into this holiday feeling down or scared, remember that a single breath, a puff of air, can fill a whole room with greatness, so just imagine what power a single word can have.



Shana Tova!

 

Yom Kippur
The Arts @ AJA
 

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Wednesday, 18 October 2017